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Rockville's place as a hub for health care and bioscience makes it fertile ground for medical and scientific researchers from around the world to compete for jobs requiring specialized skills and experience—and often visas.

On Tuesday, at the Universities at Shady Grove, immigration law firm Taylor & Ryan, LLC will host a two-hour session on the immigration options available to workers seeking permanent resident status—aka green cards—for themselves and their families.

“These are people who may qualify for permanent residence for their significant contributions in the fields of science and medicine,” said Mary Ryan of Taylor & Ryan. “They’re already here and on Tuesday we’ll be talking to people who might want to consider these routes.”

(Left to right) Nick Hammond, chief technology officer; Ken Malone, CEO; and Srinivas Rapireddy, research scientist, talk in Ablitech Inc.'s new lab. (Kim Hairston, Baltimore Sun / February 15, 2012)

Ken Malone and the board members of his startup biotech company gathered in a conference room at the University of Southern Mississippi last October to make a gut-wrenching decision.

Ablitech Inc.'s funding was slowly drying up, and it couldn't find new sources in Mississippi. If the company stayed, it would wither away.

The only option left for Ablitech, they decided, was for the fledgling company to move.

"We called our shareholders together and said, 'Look, if we stay here, we're going to die,'" Malone recalled recently.

For months, Malone and one of the firm's co-founders scoured the East Coast, from North Carolina to Boston, for a new home. They chose Baltimore.

Ablitech's choice this year was a modest win for the still-growing University of Maryland BioPark on the west side of downtown, where about 500 people work. The company brings only a handful of jobs, and its cancer-stopping technology is years — and millions of dollars — away from animal and human trials, let alone commercialization.

Edward M. Rudnic, president and CEO of Advancis Pharmaceutical Corp. will speak at the upcoming biotechnology industry annual convention at the Washington Convention Center this weekend.

A Gaithersburg biotech that’s developing regenerative therapies for wound care has continued to broaden its scope by acquiring a North Carolina company focused on stem cell treatments for stroke and other conditions.

In an all-stock transaction, publicly traded Cytomedix agreed last week to pay $16 million — and up to $40 million, if certain milestones are achieved — for privately held Aldagen of Durham, N.C. As part of the deal, Aldagen investors bought $5 million of Cytomedix common stock in a private placement.

TEDCO

The Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) announced the creation of the Maryland Entrepreneurs Resource List (MERL), a listing of Maryland entrepreneurs available to take on a management role with a start-up company within the next 18 months or those interested in mentoring start-up companies. Compiled with the goal of fostering entrepreneurial activity in the State, MERL serves as a one-stop shop for entrepreneurs interested in joining a start-up opportunity or entrepreneurs willing to provide advice and guidance on a pro bono basis. TEDCO is looking to grow the list, which already includes entrepreneurs in the areas of biotechnology, chemistry, medical devices, network and wireless solutions, physics, engineering and software.

"The Maryland Entrepreneurs Resource List will be a tremendous asset for this community as it will nurture new entrepreneurs and start-up companies," said Robert Rosenbaum, president and executive director of TEDCO. "Maryland is fortunate to have a rich network of entrepreneurs spanning various disciplines and industries, and now these individuals have an invaluable resource when looking for guidance, direction and opportunity. With Governor O'Malley's proposed Maryland Innovation Initiative slated to provide additional and much-needed funding to entrepreneurs, we hope this unique and credible list will further connect the entrepreneur community and facilitate growth for an innovation-driven economy."

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Net income at United Therapeutics Corp.    surged more than four-fold in its latest quarter as sales rose and the Silver Spring pharmaceutical firm curbed expenses.

United Therapeutics (NASDAQ: UTHR) maintained the sales growth momentum of its line-up of cardiopulmonary hypertension medicines in the fourth quarter. Total revenue increased 19 percent to $195.2 million.

Derek Gabbard, CEO of Lookingglass Cyber Solutions in Canton. Gabbard's company recently raised $5 million from investors. (Lloyd Fox, Baltimore Sun / February 2, 2012)

Derek Gabbard wasn't dreaming of California when he sought to raise investment capital for his Baltimore-based cybersecurity firm.

But the CEO of Lookingglass Cyber Solutions lucked out with a connection to venture capitalists in the state that dwarfs all others in terms of venture capital. With a San Francisco investment firm taking the lead on the investment and a Maryland firm following, Gabbard recently raised $5 million.

Such deals, where Mid-Atlantic technology companies straddle both coasts for investors, have been cropping up lately, though the dynamics underlying them vary. Leaders of local companies hunting for early-stage financing have made pilgrimages to California and either returned with a big check — or advice to move to that state or New York City if they want to build their businesses.

research

About three times each week, an enterprising researcher at theUniversity of Maryland, College Park, takes a step toward patenting an invention. Each year, that results in the creation of about five new high-tech firms, the kinds of businesses often credited with creating good jobs.

That's a good start, but the school's goal is to double that rate in the next few years. With a small but smartly focused investment by the state, we can get there — and all Marylanders can benefit.

Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposed Maryland Innovation Initiative offers a significant advance to our state's tech-based economic development. It commits $6 million to boost commercialization of university research and creates incentives for statewide collaborations that will strengthen our high-tech sector. Additionally, through tax credits, InvestMaryland will raise $70 million to replenish the state's venture capital fund. This gives vital support to start-up firms.

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Hopkins has launched the China STEM program in partnership with Nanjing University, reports a Johns Hopkins University publication, The News-Letter.

Beginning in the summer of 2012, this eight-week long summer program will take place at the Hopkins-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing, and at Peking University in Beijing.

First proposed in 2009, the program will be led by program director Dr. Ninping Yu and be open to Hopkins students, students from other universities, and professionals.

Montgomery County Community College

When you think of artists in the Philadelphia suburbs, scenic Bucks County comes to mind.

Hoping to change that perception and give Montgomery County a leg up as a haven for artists and the arts, the Creative Montco Initiative named Karen Stout, president of Montgomery County Community College, as its leader.

“We’re trying to represent the entirety of Montgomery County,” said Laura Burnham, executive director of Abington Art Center, a member of the Creative Montco Steering Committee. “We were looking for someone who has a broad perspective. Karen really has an amazing expertise and network across the county, both in the business community and the education community and that’s really important to arts and culture.”

Greg Cangialosi (right), Sean Lane (center) and Mike Brenner are looking for up to five companies for their accelerator.

Greg Cangialosi’s new business accelerator will soon be looking for Baltimore’s next crop of startup tech firms.

Cangialosi, who sold Baltimore’s Blue Sky Factory    last year, plans to launch his Locust Point accelerator with business partner Sean Lane, CEO of BTS Corp., by mid-April. Cangialosi said he will then start selecting startup companies for the accelerator.

White House

In 2008, federal agencies obligated $28.4 billion to 1,316 academic institutions for science and engineering activities, according to data from the National Science Foundation. Although this represents a 0.9% increase in current dollars over 2007 levels, it represents a 1.4% decrease in inflation-adjusted 2005 dollars. The Johns Hopkins University (including its Applied Physics Laboratory) continued to be the leading academic recipient of federal S&E obligations, followed by the University of Washington and the campuses of the University of Michigan. Together, the top 20 institutions received 34.4 percent of all federal S&E obligations in 2008.

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Today, President Obama will host the second White House Science Fair celebrating the student winners of a broad range of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) competitions from across the country. The President will also announce key additional steps that the Administration and its partners are taking to prepare 100,000 effective math and science teachers and to meet the urgent need to train one million additional STEM graduates over the next decade.

“When students excel in math and science, they help America compete for the jobs and industries of the future,” said President Obama. “That’s why I’m proud to celebrate outstanding students at the White House Science Fair, and to announce new steps my Administration and its partners are taking to help more young people succeed in these critical subjects."

Maryland

The InvestMaryland program will be investing approximately $47-55M into several venture capital firms by mid-2012.  The Maryland Venture Fund Authority (MVFA) will be hiring a consultant to assist in the evaluation and selection of venture firms based on the selection criteria detailed in the InvestMaryland Program annotated code 6-518 – Selecting Applicants.

To be certified

For venture capital firms seeking to apply for investment funds from the Invest/Maryland Program, you must be Certified.

Certification is defined in the Maryland annotated code 6-518c1-c2 as:

(1)   The applicant must have at the time of application, an equity capitalization, net assets, or written commitments of at least $500,000 in the form of cash or cash equivalents; and

(2)   At least two principals or persons employed to direct the investment of the designated capital of the applicant must have at least 5 years of money management experience in the venture capital or private equity sectors.

No later than 90 days after an application is filed, the Secretary shall either:

(1)   Issue the certification; or

(2)   Refuse to issue the certification and communicate in detail to the applicant the grounds for the refusal.

Legal

The January 2012 issue of Baltimore magazine recognized three Venable partners as being among the top attorneys in the state.  Venable partners Mike Baader, Kevin Shepherd and Ron Taylor each were highlighted as one of the Top 100 lawyers in the state of Maryland in the SuperLawyers ranking that was published in the magazine.

Technology

The issue is called technology transfer, and it has not been one of Maryland’s strengths.

For all of the state’s success in attracting research dollars to an array of universities and institutions with world-class experts and facilities, it has not matched that success in spinning off commercial ventures from that research to generate jobs and economic growth.

This gap has been of growing concern to leaders in business, academia and government. Now Gov. Martin O’Malley has set out to do something about it, albeit belatedly, and we applaud his effort.

Art Jacoby

The Tech Council of Maryland    has named Art Jacoby, a Catonsville, Md.-based small business consultant, as its interim CEO.

Jacoby, who is also a managing partner at Maryland Cyber Investment Partners, will head up the technology and biotech trade group while it looks for a full-time replacement for former chief executive Renee Winsky, who left the council in December. In an interview Monday, Jacoby said he expects to hold the position for two to five months – however long it takes to find a permanent chief.

OMalley

Gov. Martin O‟Malley will call for more than $6 million to spin research conducted at university labs    into new companies, aides said Tuesday.

The proposal seeks to address the gulf between the state‟s strong track record in attracting research dollars and relative lack of success in turning that funding into commercial ventures, an issue that commands the attention of academics and business leaders alike.

The new state allotment would be used to fund promising technologies and fund research of others.

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Scientist

A decade ago, Maryland's chief competition in the bioscience industry came from the coasts: New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts on the East and California on the West.

Since then, a crop of emerging biotech clusters has started to make its mark, hailing from the Midwest and farther south into Texas and Florida.

As these new competitors seek their place in the market, Maryland's state officials and business executives hope to maintain and expand its biotech presence through a strategy of organic growth.

Medicine

Healthcare is caught in a slow-motion collision between two 21st Century realities. The world’s growing and aging population creates ever-greater needs for treatment. At the same time, limited resources constrict the availability of quality care.

Perhaps half the people who die each day – more in poor areas – suffer from diseases that are preventable or curable. While medical advances do help patients live longer, the costs of care are rising. And even as science discovers new mechanisms of disease, medicine relies too much on trial and error.

The good news is, solutions are at hand to improve the health of the world’s 7 billion people. We can transform healthcare systems to care for patients in more sustained and cost-effective ways.

OpGen

Gaithersburg-based OpGen has closed on a third round of venture capital that could add as much as $17 million to the company’s coffers if it meets certain milestones, an executive said.

Chief Executive Douglas White declined to specify how much money the company has collected immediately, but said he anticipates the firm will eventually use the entire amount.

University of Maryland Logo

Elana Fine, who heads an angel investor network organized by the University of Maryland    ’s Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship, has been promoted to replace Dingman’s longtime managing director, Asher Epstein.

The leadership shuffle comes at a time when the Dingman Center Angels is sharply stepping up its investment activity, inking eight early-stage deals in 2011 — twice as many as it signed in 2010. The angel group was formerly known as the Capital Access Network but rebranded last year.

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The legislative compromise on a short-term payroll tax extension dominated headlines in late December, but few journalists heralded a provision that was included in the bill that will help small businesses and boost America’s economy: the six-year reauthorization of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

The SBIR program helps empower our nation’s small entrepreneurs by funding a major federal Research & Development endeavor, creating new jobs and growing our economy. As a member of the Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, I have been a long-time supporter of this highly successful program.

Christopher Anderson/The Gazette “I think research is critical to the future of the defense and intelligence community,” says Charles Goldblum, new executive business director of the John Hopkins Applied Physics Lab's Research and Exploratory Development Department.

As the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel consolidates several of its major areas, it has tapped a science veteran of almost 30 years to ensure it is ready to meet the needs of its federal military and research customers.

“We need to make sure we strategically invest program development funds to best support our customers,” said Charles Goldblum, who was recently named business area executive for the lab’s new department.

The Research and Exploratory Development Department was created this fall to develop and nurture new technologies to meet emerging national challenges.

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An innovative Maryland technology transfer program - the first of its kind in the United States to partner federal labs and public universities - has received an award honoring its success.

The Maryland Proof of Concept Alliance, which teams the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the University System of Maryland, was recognized as a national model by a group representing federal labs.

The Mid-Atlantic Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer (FLC) - has made the Alliance the first recipient of its Partnership Award honoring successful collaborations between educational institutions and federal labs.

MedImmune

MedImmune today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved FluMist® Quadrivalent (Influenza Vaccine Live, Intranasal) for prevention of influenza. The company submitted the sBLA early in the second quarter of last year.  FluMist Quadrivalent is the first quadrivalent influenza vaccine approved by the FDA.

All other currently available licensed seasonal influenza vaccines are trivalent, containing three strains [two strains of type A influenza (A/H1N1 and A/H3N2) and one B lineage strain].  FluMist Quadrivalent contains four strains (two type A strains and two type B lineages) to help provide broad protection against circulating influenza A and B.

Innovate

As a group, postdocs are underrepresented in entrepreneurial careers due to their need for business training, their lack of industrial experience, and their difficulty accessing entrepreneurial mentors and advisors. Through a grant from the National Science Foundation, the INNoVATE™ program addresses these needs.

INNoVATE™ is a unique program that offers scientific postdoctoral fellows and researchers the opportunity to develop the needed entrepreneurial skills to move innovations to the market. Focused on cultivating entrepreneurs from the more than 4800 postdocs in the state of Maryland, the INNoVATE™ program aims to train and educate today’s life scientists in the skills needed to create the high growth technology companies of tomorrow.

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President Barack Obama signed legislation Dec. 31 that reauthorized the Small Business Innovation Research program for six years.

Through the SBIR program, the 11 federal agencies with the biggest outside research budgets are required to spend at least 2.5 percent of this money with small businesses. The new legislation, which was attached to a defense reauthorization bill, increases that share to 3.2 percent over the next six years.

Ted Olsen

Ted Olsen needed to make his Baltimore environmental testing company sound so intriguing that the venture capitalists packing a hotel ballroom would beg to hear more.

The CEO of PathSensors Inc. was on the hunt for $1.5 million in financing. Like a business version of speed dating, Olsen had six minutes — less than the time it takes to cook spaghetti — to bring to life the company into which he poured his sweat, dreams and savings.

Dr. Sally Rockey is NIH's Deputy Director for Extramural Research, serving as the principal scientific leader and advisor to the NIH Director on the NIH extramural research program.

In a November blog post, I mentioned the myriad of activities that are impacting our Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs, one of which was the congressional effort to reauthorize these programs. Well, Congress voted on the reauthorization, and it was signed into law last December 31. I’ve been waiting until the Small Business Administration (SBA) released their interim guidance so I could give you the details of how the reauthorization will impact NIH small business grants.

The SBA guidance can be found in this blog  by Sean Greene, Associate Administrator for Investment and Special Advisor for Innovation at the SBA. It discusses the timeline Congress gave the SBA for revising the existing regulations and policy directives. They are targeting the end of 2012.

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Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer has licensed a new nanotechnology to a Gaithersburg startup for the development of cancer therapies.

The license for Artificial Immune nanotechnology was granted to NexImmune, formed in part by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine faculty members. The staff members are involved in the development of the Artificial Immune technology.

Tour Eiffel

Recovering from the failure of an oral supplement to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension, United Therapeutics has received approval in France for an intravenous treatment.

The firm also has submitted a U.S. application for a standalone oral treatment.

French regulatory agency Agence Francaise de Securite Sanitaire des Produits de Sante has approved IV use of the Silver Spring company’s Remodulin.

Remodulin already is approved in most of Europe and in the U.S. for subcutaneous infusion treatment, or continuous injections just under the skin, according to United Therapeutics information.

Almost three years ago, the Montgomery County Biosciences Task Force issued recommendations that included the formation of a public-private partnership to help take the local life sciences industry to another level.

This week, that nonprofit partnership, called BioHealth Innovation, formally incorporated and has raised more than $1 million from companies such as MedImmune of Gaithersburg and Human Genome Sciences of Rockville, along with medical system Adventist HealthCare of Rockville and Johns Hopkins University to start implementing its programs.

TEDCO

Maryland's TEDCO and a team of entrepreneurs are planning to launch a new $20 million cybersecurity fund early next year, according to Executive Director Robert Rosenbaum.

The state-sponsored investment group plans to formally announce the cyber fund in January. Rosenbaum declined to name the sponsors, whom he described as "a couple of young guys that built a fairly large cybersecurity company and sold it." The capital — assuming they are successful in raising it — would be used to invest in early-stage cyber startups, both those building products and those selling services, he said.

hrabowski-freeman-umbc-president

University of Maryland, Baltimore County is creating a “Cyber Scholars” program with a $1 million grant from the Northrop Grumman Foundation.

Beginning in 2013, the program will award scholarships, internships and opportunities for advanced research to the 15-20 students selected annually to participate. The program will aim to address cyber security workforce shortages by drawing more women and minorities to the industry, UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski said Wednesday.

umbc-northrop-gruman-cyber-scholars

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the Northrop Grumman Foundation today announced they are partnering to launch the UMBC Cyber Scholars program, which is to be housed in the university's new Cybersecurity Center, and run in partnership with the UMBC Center for Women in Technology. This new initiative is an extension of an already-strong partnership in cyber-related activities that has developed between UMBC, the foundation and Northrop Grumman, and includes the Cync program, a start-up business incubator dedicated to cultivating companies that develop innovative solutions to counter the global cyber threat.